A reader responds to the Mayday feature in our September issue – a story which covered the rescue of a crew of four when their yacht’s rig failed.

Jeanneau
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To me this article highlights the unsuitability of lightweight, mass-produced-to-a-price European boats being used in the Pacific Ocean. A 20mm stainless rod with a thread was never going to last in the Pacific. IMHO this should have been a 50mm rod with a serious connection.

Stainless steel is hard but brittle and can also corrode.

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The Med maybe gets to 70 knots with some low-fetch swells. I personally have been in 90 knots constant and 15m swells on a cruise ship. I would only risk those conditions in a Salthouse or other substantial NZ boat.

By falling apart that Jeanneau endangered many lives.

Jim Glover, Process Engineer

I think it’s worth pointing out that there are hundreds of European production boats tackling bluewater passages all over the world at any given time. Also, this Jeanneau’s stainless steel rod failed in fairly modest conditions, suggesting that crevice corrosion might have been the actual cause – not the strength of the wind or state of the sea. Ed.

A reader responds to the Mayday feature in our September issue – a story which covered the rescue of a crew of four when their yacht’s rig failed.